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Author Topic: Alternative OSes  (Read 3215 times)

ybbald

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2011, 08:36:24 pm »

I uninstalled
and reinstalled
and got the same problem x.x

I'll try IRC tomorrow I guess x.x
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Ellipsis

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2011, 10:13:22 am »

Ok, well it seems you can fix filesystems with the "fsck" command. Type "man fsck" for details on how to use it.
Edit: Go on to recovering, in the console type "sudo touch /forcefsck" now reboot and it should filesystem check. Maybe.
Editer: Well my filesystem is "read-only" this means I can't just use "sudo touch /forcefsck" in this case you can use a live cd and then use "fsck /dev/sdb1" where /dev/sdb1 is the partition you want to repair.
Now I'm going to go do that and tell you if it worked.
Editest: Yes that fixed my filesystem.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2011, 10:57:29 am by Ellipsis »
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ybbald

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2011, 11:28:14 am »

use a live cd?

Also, how do I make it reboot from there? I don't know how, so I've just had to unplug it each time >_>
and what exactly am I typing?
"fsck /dev/sdb1"??
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Ellipsis

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #18 on: October 07, 2011, 12:50:58 pm »

Ah sorry. I should explain more.
shutdown now or shutdown 0 should turn the computer off from the terminal (the terminal is the thing where you type in the white text on the black background).
If you don't have permission to do something add "sudo" to the start of the command to do that command as an admin.
A live cd is a cd that you can run as an OS on your computer, the advantage is that you then do not need to be using your harddrive. This is sometimes useful when you want to do things to your harddrive you could not do while you were using it. You cannot use fsck on your harddrive to fix it while you are using that harddrive.
Fsck is a command to run the program Fsck. You can find out about a program by typing "man <program name>" so "man fsck" tells you about the fsck command.
You can then use up and down arrow keys to scoll though the manual text and "q" to exit the manual and return to the terminal.
Fsck is a command used to fix harddrives. It can only fix a harddrive that is not currently in use or "mounted".
Because of this you must either have fsck check your harddrive when you computer boots up (you do this by setting it to run next time the computer boots up then rebooting (or turning the computer off then turning it on again, it's the same thing)) or by running fsck on the harddrive when it is not mounted (not in use). You can set fsck to run next time the computer turns on by using "touch /forcefsck" This simply creates an empty file in the root of your harddrive (the equivalent of putting a file in C:\, we put it in /), this file is just called "forcefsck". This in itself does nothing, however when your computer first goes on it checks to see if this file exists, if it does it will run fsck on your harddrive and fix the problems.
As I said, if you can't use "touch /forcefsck" due to lack of permition try running it as an admin by instead doing "sudo touch /forcefsck". It will then ask for you admin password to do this, type it and press enter (it will not show *s or anything while you type but it is working).
If you get a "drive mounted as read-only" error then the touch thing isn't going to work, you'll have to instead run fsck while your harddrive is not mounted (in use).
You can do this by putting a live usb stick or cd in your computer. The ubuntu cd that you used to install ubuntu will work just fine. Then you select "just run ubuntu without changes to the OS" or something. This will boot up ubuntu from the cd and let you do things without ever using your harddrive. Now you can open a terminal up and type in fsck <harddrive>.
This tells fsck to fix that harddrive.
While you only have 1 harddrive in real life (I think) you'll still have it in partitions and these are considered separate harddrives.
"/dev/sdb1" is an example of what a name of a harddrive might look like.
If you can run gparted (you might be able to find it in the list of programs installed under system > administrator at the top. Then it will list in an easy to understand way all your harddrives.
I have /dev/sda1 611.01GiB (this is my Ubuntu harddrive)
/dev/sda3 317.58GiB (this is my gentoo harddrive)
/dev/sda2 (extended, this is 2.93GiB and not even a real harddrive, just a holder for the next one)
/dev/sda5 2.93GiB (this is my linux-swap, it's used when I start to run out of RAM)
You'll just need to find the broken one, Ubuntu for you and then do "fsck /dev/sda1"
If you've not sure just try the above command and then maybe "fsck /dev/sda2" It's likely to be one or the other and fixing one that dosn't need to be isn't a bad thing.
Or to do it the correct way without gparted:
run "fdisk -l", this will just show your your partitions. It will look like this:
Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00009163

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1       79763   640688128   83  Linux
/dev/sda2          121220      121602     3068929    5  Extended
/dev/sda3           79763      121220   333002752   83  Linux
/dev/sda5          121220      121602     3068928   82  Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order

So here you can again tell it's /dev/sda1, both because it is of type "Linux" and because it is the largest their.
After you get fsck to run it will ask you if you want to fix -----, just keep pressing "y" to tell it yes, you'd like to fix that thing.
Good luck.
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ybbald

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2011, 05:38:11 pm »

ok I am now able to log on the reinstalled version, but I havent had time to do that stuff yet. I will do it after dinner. Ubuntu is installing updates right now.

Now, I have 35 gigs of music on my windows partition. How do I play it from Ubuntu? If I have to copy it over, I can do that since my harddrive (as a whole) is only using like <150 gigs out of 750 total. Except, when I was making my Ubuntu partition, the largest size the installer gave me was 30 gigs, so I would have to increase the Ubuntu partition to do that.
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[redacted]

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #20 on: October 07, 2011, 05:46:27 pm »

Try accessing your C drive(If that is your Windows Drive) by what ever is the start menu/my computer on Linux.
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Ellipsis

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #21 on: October 07, 2011, 05:58:04 pm »

Yes, you can still read data like music etc. from your old windows harddrive at a good speed, although a little slower than it reads "real" linux systems.
If you use windows and linux together a lot many people will have part of the harddrive fat32, this is useful mostly just because both windows and linux support it very well.
Something to remember however is that with yoursetup linux will be suckish at writing data to your windows harddrive. It's read-only (mostly).
If you got Ubuntu to login you probably no longer need to use fsck to fix the system, although "sudo touch /forcefsck" won't hurt if you want.
I'm sure ubuntu does allow you to have over 30gigs of space. However you may need to shink down your windows partition (harddrive) to make space, then you can just expand the linux partition into it.
If you ticked, "install 3rd party codecs when it asked, as I'd suggest you should (have)" then mp3 files will just work, open them by double clicking or load them into clementine player (it's a little like itunes).
If you didn't get the 3rd party codecs then no worries. You'll just need to tick them in the list of things you can install and after that they will work.

Try and find your windows harddrive. It should be an icon on your desktop. Just open it up and find the music, then you can get it playing straight away with a double click.
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ybbald

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #22 on: October 07, 2011, 11:32:44 pm »

I can't find the files from my Windows partition. They don't appear on the desktop
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Ellipsis

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Re: Alternative OSes
« Reply #23 on: October 08, 2011, 03:30:56 pm »

Try click places > computer.
Then see if it's there.
Also does your windows partition definitely still exist?
Open the terminal and run "fdisk -l"
Please post the output.
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